Publications By EEOB Faculty November 1 - November 30

November 5, 2019

Publications By EEOB Faculty November 1 - November 30

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Fish Diet Shifts Associated with the Northern Gulf of Mexico Hypoxic Zone

Cassandra N. Glaspie, Melissa Clouse, Klaus Huebert, Stuart A. Ludsin, Doran M. Mason, James J. Pierson, Michael R. Roman, Stephen B. Brandt. 2019. Estuaries and Coasts. https://doi.org/10.1007/s12237-019-00626-x

Abstract

The occurrence of low dissolved oxygen (hypoxia) in coastal waters may alter trophic interactions within the water column. This study identified a threshold at which hypoxia in the northern Gulf of Mexico (NGOMEX) alters composition of fish catch and diet composition (stomach contents) of fishes using fish trawl data from summers 2006–2008. Hypoxia in the NGOMEX impacted fish catch per unit effort (CPUE) and diet below dissolved oxygen thresholds of 1.15 mg L−1 (for fish CPUE) and 1.71 mg L−1 (for diet). CPUE of many fish species was lower at hypoxic sites (≤ 1.15 mg L−1) as compared to normoxic regions (> 1.15 mg L−1 ), including the key recreational or commercial fish species Atlantic croaker Micropogonias undulatus and red snapper Lutjanus campechanus. Overall, fish diets from hypoxic sites (≤ 1.71 mg L−1 ) and normoxic sites (> 1.71 mg L−1 ) differed. Fish caught in normoxic regions consumed a greater mass of benthic prey (ex. gastropods, polychaetes) than fish caught in hypoxic regions. Hypoxia may increase predation risk of small zooplankton, with observations of increased mass of small zooplankton in fish stomachs when bottom hypoxia was present. Changes in contributions of small zooplankton and benthic prey to fish diet in hypoxic areas may alter energy flow in the NGOMEX pelagic food web and should be considered in fishery management.